The Rapidly Escalating Topic of Cybersecurity

Quantum computing continues to make breakthroughs in the way data is secured. In a recent article on Digital Trends, Matthew S. Smith, dives into the topic of cybersecurity in his weekly column, (in)Secure. His article goes on to say quantum physics can be used to protect both current and future threats. 

In an interview, Quantum Xchange CEO and President, John Prisco was asked what makes quantum computing better at cracking than conventional encryption. In his response, Prisco noted that quantum computing does not use bits that are either one or zero, but instead uses photons that can be simultaneously ones and zeros. He went on to say that primary computers used today do not have massively parallel processing capabilities because bits can only exist in either a one or zero state.

Quantum computing takes about 10 seconds to complete what it would take a conventional computer billions of years to accomplish. Prisco explained that a quantum key is composed of photons and if someone tries to eavesdrop on the key, the quantum state changes and the key no longer will unlock the data.  The immutable laws of physics provide assurance no one can unlock your data and read your file.

Pioneering the term, “unbreakable encryption,” Quantum Xchange believes to break a quantum key would require extraordinary circumstances. Prisco points out that the technology has been around for several years and is currently being used by Geneva’s government of elections to transmit polling data. The goal is to prevent hackers from stealing data and if quantum computers are used, then quantum encryption is the first line defense.

Ultimately, the real goal is a quantum prime computer. Prisco states that getting there will take time and nefarious players will always be the challenge. But, now there is the confidence that no one can unlock your data and read your data file using quantum computing. 

Read more the full article: Quantum computers could break encryption, so it’s going quantum too